Symposia at SGM 2019

  1. Structural Geology, Tectonics and Geodynamics
  2. Mineralogy, Petrology, Geochemistry
  3. Stable isotope geochemistry: development and applications
  4. Palaeontology
  5. Stratigraphy
  6. Seismic Hazard and Risk in Switzerland: From Science to Mitigation
  7. Deep geothermal energy, CO2-storage and shale-gas
  8. Quaternary environments: landscapes, climate, ecosystems and human activity during the past 2.6 million years
  9. Geomorphology
  10. Soil: Formation, Processes, and Conservation
  11. Cryospheric Sciences
  12. Hydrology, Limnology and Hydrogeology
  13. Public Engagement with Climate Change: Interdisciplinary Challenges
  14. Environmental Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements
  15. Atmospheric Processes and Interactions with the Biosphere
  16. Phenology and seasonality
  17. Aerosols and clouds in a changing world
  18. Remote Sensing of the Spheres
  19. Geoscience and Geoinformation – From data acquisition to modelling and visualisation
  20. Taking stock of transformative research and education on mountains. What future avenues?
  21. Human Geographies: Bodies, Cultures, Societies
  22. Human Geographies: Cities, Regions, Economies
  23. Human Geographies: Materials, Natures, Politics
  24. The limits to Earth: thinking social-ecological transitions in a post-extractive economy
  25. Towards the sustainable management and governance of land resources and land systems

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1. Structural Geology, Tectonics and Geodynamics.

Guido Schreurs, Neil Mancktelow, Paul Tackley

Swiss Tectonics Studies Group of the Swiss Geological Society

Presentations are invited considering structural geology, tectonics, and geodynamics, including field, experimental and model studies of structures at all scales. The session should also provide a forum for interdisciplinary contributions studying the interplay between surface processes, topography and tectonics. Young researchers are particularly encouraged to participate and present their results.

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2. Mineralogy, Petrology, Geochemistry

Sébastien Pilet, Bernard Grobéty, Eric Reusser

Swiss Society of Mineralogy and Petrology (SSMP)

This session aims to provide a platform for research reports in all fields related to mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry that are not covered by other sessions (e.g. experimental petrology, volcanology, analytical approaches etc.). Furthermore, it provides a platform to young scientists that want to report about the results of their PhD/master projects. It is planned to have an accompanying poster session.

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3. Stable isotope geochemistry: development and applications

Afifé El Korh, Andres Rüggeberg, Nicolas Greber

Analytical improvements in the domain of mass spectrometry (e.g. MC-ICPMS, SIMS, TIMS) over the past twenty years have allowed the development of protocols for precise, accurate and representative measurements of many stable isotope systems. The growth of non-traditional stable isotope database (or “metal stable isotopes”; e.g. Li, B, Mg, Ca, Fe, Ge, Ti, V, Cr, Zn, Ba, Mo, Ni, U) has improved significantly our understanding of the mechanisms controlling metal isotope fractionation during various geochemical processes, as they can fractionate at both low- and high-temperature. Therefore, they became powerful tools in geochemistry and are applied as tracers of natural processes in various domains of Earth Sciences, including geochemistry of magmatic and metamorphic rocks, sedimentology, cosmochemistry, environmental geochemistry and biogeochemistry. Likewise, “traditional” stable isotopes (such as O and C) are now measured with higher precision and spatial resolution, which opens new research avenues.

This session invites contributions investigating the modes and mechanisms of stable isotope fractionation and their application in exploring surface and deep Earth geochemical processes.

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4. Palaeontology

Torsten Scheyer, Christian Klug, Lionel Cavin

Schweizerische Paläontologische Gesellschaft,
Kommission des Schweizerischen Paläontologischen Abhandlungen (KSPA)

This session is dedicated to all subdisciplines of palaeontology in Switzerland and all other countries. Presentations and posters may deal with macro- and microfossils, all major clades including prokaryotes, eucaryotes, Metazoans, plants etc. Preferred topics are evolution, biostratigraphy, palaeobiogeography, palaeoecology including palaeoclimate, bio-events, evo-devo, but results from other fields may be presented as well. Fossils provide essential data to document the history of life and evolution; index fossils provide important data for stratigraphic correlations; recently, fossils (especially of plants) have been widely used in research on palaeoclimate. Session language is English.

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5. Stratigraphy

Alain Morard, Reto Burkhalter, Oliver Kempf & Ursula Menkveld-Gfeller

Swiss Commitee for Stratigraphy (SKS/CSS),
Swiss Palaeontological Society (SPG/SPS),

This session is dedicated to the presentation and discussion of new results from all stratigraphic subdisciplines: lithostratigraphy, chronostratigraphy, chemostratigraphy, sequence stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, … The program will be coordinated with the paleontology session.
Talks and posters on specific regional questions, broader scale correlations and reconstitutions, as well as on new methodological developments, are most welcome.

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6. Seismic Hazard and Risk in Switzerland: From Science to Mitigation

Donat Fäh, Katrin Beyer, Blaise Duvernay

Schweizerischen Gesellschaft für Erdbebeningenieurwesen und Baudynamik (SGEB)

Earthquake risk mitigation in Switzerland started about 20 years ago. Since then, several important steps have been taken towards a more systematic implementation of preventive and preparation measures. Scientific studies from different research fields formed the base for decision-making in this continuous process. On-going research includes the estimation and consequences of strong ground shaking, the assessment and improvement of engineered structures, as well as studies on potential earthquake-triggered mass movements, liquefaction in alluvial plains and tsunamis in lakes.

We invite researchers working in the fields of seismic hazard, vulnerability and risk to contribute to this session. The session covers all earthquake-related research topics in natural sciences, structural and civil engineering, and social sciences, and aims at bringing together researchers with practitioners, specialists from industry, and decision makers from cantonal and federal offices.

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7. Deep geothermal energy, CO2-storage and shale-gas

Larryn Diamond, Paul Bossart, Benoît Valley

This symposium deals with research and exploration of the sub-surface geology for the energy sector, and focusses on 3 topics: deep geothermal energy, carbon sequestration and shale gas.

Geothermal heat extracted from depth in excess of 400 meters is defined as deep geothermal energy. The heat is extracted by hot-dry-rock processes or by drilling into aquifers or tectonic faults.

Carbon sequestration describes long-term storage of carbon dioxide or other forms of carbon in geological formations. It is a method to slow down greenhouse gases, which are mainly released by burning fossil fuels.

Shale gas is natural gas that is trapped within shale formations. Horizontal drilling is often performed where hydraulic fracturing (fracking) is applied to create extensive artificial fractures around the borehole, followed by the release of the gases into the borehole.

Presentations related to these 3 topics are kindly invited. This includes field exploration work, lab experiments and modelling studies at all scales, but also work dealing with legal aspects is welcomed.

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8. Quaternary environments: landscapes, climate, ecosystems and human activity during the past 2.6 million years

Naki Akçar, Christine PümpinGaudenz Deplazes, Stephanie Wirth, Jean Nicolas Haas, René Löpfe, Loren Eggenschwiler and Marc Luetscher

Swiss Society for Quaternary Research (CH-QUAT)

During the Quaternary Period, the last 2.6 million years of Earth’s history, changes in environments and climate shaped human evolution. In particular, large-scale features of atmospheric circulation patterns varied significantly due to the dramatic changes in global boundary conditions which accompanied abrupt changes in climate.

Past variations in the geosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and in climate were archived in Quaternary deposits and provide critical information for the interpretation of present and future environmental changes. Quaternary research focuses on understanding these changes in environmental conditions, and on assessing their impact on landscapes, ecosystems, and human societies.

Within this context, this session brings together scientists from diverse disciplines in Earth Science, Archaeology and Environmental Science. In addition to studies focusing on the reconstruction and impact of past environmental change, we also invite presentations focusing on human expansions and cultural development, and contributions to methodological improvements in climate proxy studies or in methods of age determination. Topics may include all aspects of Quaternary science and we strongly encourage students and young scientists to present the results of their ongoing research..

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9. Geomorphology

Nikolaus Kuhn, Christoph Graf, Isabell Kull, Geraldine Regolini, Isabelle Gärtner-Roer, Margreth Keiler, Christophe Lambiel, Christian Scapozza, Reynald Delaloye, Negar Haghipour

Swiss Geomorphological Society

The Swiss Geomorphological Society (SGmS) invites people from research and practice to present their geomorphologic work at the 17th Swiss Geoscience Meeting. Young scientists are particularly encouraged to take the opportunity of submitting their theses and fostering relationships with colleagues.

The topic of the 2019 Swiss Geoscience Meeting Geoscience goes underground: understanding resources and processes closely relates to the study of Earth’s surface processes, forms, materials and the evolution of landscapes conducted by geomorphologists. Form and processes of the Earth surface affect the planet’s patterns of habitats, the provision and access to environmental services, and the exposure to natural hazards.

As scientists and practitioners, often in close collaboration with related disciplines, geomorphologists try to gain an understanding of the dynamic planet Earth and the associated impacts on geosystems and societies. In particular, questions such as resource management (water, soil, Earth materials), ecological networks sensu lato (ecosystems, geodiversity, biodiversity), or the safety and security of territory and human population (hazards, risks, exposure, health, agriculture, forests, changing climate) are studied in geomorphology.

Understanding our relationship with the Earth is even more relevant in times when planetary boundaries are reached or have been crossed. Looking at other planets, geomorphology also contributes to deciphering their past or present habitability. Therefore, the conveners of this session at the 17th Swiss Geoscience Meeting encourage contributions from all areas of basic and applied geomorphology, including studies of the past and present processes and their implications for the evolution of Earth, the influence of global change and how it may influence the Earth’s surface, natural hazards and resources in the future.

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10. Soil: Formation, Processes, and Conservation

Klaus Jarosch, Tobias Sprafke, Tatenda Lemann, Volker Prasuhn

Soil is the interface of all geospheres and involves the complex interaction of weathering, geomorphic processes, bioturbation and other processes from the micro to the macroscale. In addition to its central functions for geo-ecosystems and biodiversity, water-, nutrient cycles and carbon sequestration, soil serves essential human needs (e.g. food production) and it is a record of landscape evolution and human-environment interaction. Both physical and chemical threats to the pedosphere (e.g. erosion, compaction, contamination) require multifaceted measures for its protection and conservation.

This session is dedicated to soil and therefore interdisciplinary. It unites soil geographers, soil physicists, -chemists, -biologists as well as agronomists and researchers working on sustainable land use. The aim of this session is to provide a platform of exchange related to the different perspectives to the pedosphere. We welcome contributions using field-based methods, laboratory techniques or modelling approaches related to:

    1. soil formation, classification and distribution
    2. soil processes on different levels and spatiotemporal scales
    3. assessment of soil threats and sustainable soil conservation measures.

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11. Cryospheric Sciences

Matthias HussMartin Heggli, Theo Jenk, Nadine Salzmann, Daniel Tobler, Andreas Vieli

Swiss Snow, Ice and Permafrost Society

This session addresses all topics related to the Alpine and polar cryosphere. We expect contributions covering the whole range of Alpine and polar snow, ice and permafrost research.
We encourage theoretical, experimental as well as practical contributions, especially from young researchers. Presentations that address the aspects of dynamics and thermodynamics of snow, ice and permafrost and impacts related to natural hazards are particularly welcomed.

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12. Hydrology, Limnology and Hydrogeology

Peter Molnar, Michael Doering, Tobias Jonas, Sandra PoolMichael Sinreich, Sanja Hosi

Swiss Society for Hydrology and Limnology SGHL,
Swiss Hydrological Commission CHy,
Swiss Hydrogeological Society SGH

The session is open to contributions dealing with hydrology, limnology and hydrogeology at all scales, including contributions demonstrating interdisciplinary approaches.

This year particularly welcome are topics dealing with better understanding and quantifying the connection between surface water and groundwater across scales. This includes observations of processes and patterns, process modelling and field experiments.

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13. Public Engagement with Climate Change: Interdisciplinary Challenges

Moritz Gubler, Marc Eyer, Adrian Brügger, Kathrin Nägeli, Maurice Skelton

Swiss Association for Geographic Education (VGDch)

Despite high levels of public awareness about anthropogenic climate change, climate action among large parts of the general public still remains relatively low. However, Greta Thunberg’s global activism and ensuing national climate demonstrations with ten thousands of predominantly young participants may have uncovered potentially new drivers, processes, and forms of public engagement with climate change. So what are the pre-conditions, factors, and mechanisms that facilitate or prevent public action on climate change among different segments of the population? And what are the consequences for climate change education and communication efforts? Here, various disciplines within the educational, psychological, social, and climate sciences as well as humanities can provide the theoretical and practical instruments to under-stand publics‘ engagement with climate change.

This session aims to provide multiple perspectives into the challenges and opportuni-ties of climate change communication and education. Inviting contributions from a broad range of disciplines (e.g. education, psychology, communication, public under-standing of science, humanities, social & natural sciences), this session focuses on the perception, processing, communication, application, learning, and education of climate information and knowledge. Talks or posters may relate to all approaches (both theoretical and practical; quantitative and qualitative), scales (i.e. local, national, global), and age levels (i.e. children, youths, adults). We encourage contributions from young scientists (MSc- or PhD-projects), while interdisciplinary projects are especially welcomed too.

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14. Environmental Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements

Montserrat Filella, Moritz BigalkeAdrien Mestrot, Andreas Voegelin, Lenny Winkel

Trace elements play crucial roles in aquatic and terrestrial environments as growth-limiting nutrients, but also as highly toxic or radioactive compounds. Trace elements derived from both natural and anthropogenic sources may thus critically affect ecosystem functioning and productivity as well as human health.

The environmental fate and impact of trace elements are controlled by their speciation and the intimate coupling of abiotic and biotic transformation processes at different scales, and are closely linked to the biogeochemical cycling of other elements such as Fe, Mn, Ca, P, S, or C.

To advance the state of knowledge on the biogeochemistry of trace elements from the molecular to the global scale, state-of-the-art analytical methods such as hyphenated and isotope techniques, synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopies, electron microscopies as well as (bio)geochemical and geostatistical modeling approaches can be used.

For this session, we invite contributions concerned with (bio)geochemical processes and their effects on trace element speciation, mobility, bioavailability, toxicity and distribution in natural and engineered environmental systems on different scales.

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15. Atmospheric Processes and Interactions with the Biosphere

Christof Ammann, Stefan Brönnimann, Susanne Burri, Martin Steinbacher

ACP – Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

The aim of this session is to provide a platform for research reports from all fields related to atmospheric sciences including biosphere–atmosphere exchange and interactions. The session welcomes contributions that focus on relevant aspects of atmospheric, surface, or ecosystem processes, which either influence atmospheric composition and climate or are influenced by them. Exchange and feedback processes are of key interest, but also case studies of specific chemical, physical or ecosystem processes are welcome, as well as insights from long-term monitoring and larger research infrastructures like ICOS-CH (Integrated Carbon Observation System, Switzerland).

The session is suited to researchers working in the field of Climate Sciences, Atmospheric Physics and Chemistry, Physical Geography, Meteorology, Ecology and Agricultural Sciences. We especially encourage young scientists to present their Master theses or PhD projects, either in the oral or in the accompanying poster session.

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16. Phenology and seasonality

Yann Vitasse, Sibylle Stöckli, This Rutishauser

Swiss Commission for Phenology and Seasonality (CPS)

Phenology has been shown as one of the best biological indicators of global warming worldwide. Changes in plant and animal seasonality affect ecosystems structure and functions and feedback on the earth’s global climate through alteration of the carbon budget and water exchange with the atmosphere.

In this session, we welcome all studies related to the timing of biotic and abiotic events, in particular contributions directly related to Switzerland and the Alpine region and/or contributions addressing phenological changes with cross-disciplinary perspectives. We are looking for contributions that present seasonality changes based on recent plant and animal phenological observations, timing in cryospheric and hydrological systems, historical documentary sources, or seasonality measurements using climate data, remote sensing, flux measurements or modelling studies.

We invite contributions from master and PhD students as well as senior scientists likewise to foster a lively discussion. The session will conclude with the award ceremony of the «Schweizer Wettbewerb für Phänologie und Saisonalität».

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17. Aerosols and clouds in a changing world

Christopher Hoyle, Ulrich Krieger

ACP – Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry

This session covers all topics related to aerosols, clouds and their interactions. Topics include for example, the chemistry and physics of aerosol formation and growth, the influence of aerosols on cloud formation and properties, chemical reactions occurring in aerosol particles and cloud droplets, aerosol formation from anthropogenic activities, and the role of the biosphere in aerosol production.

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18. Remote Sensing of the Spheres

Stefan Wunderle, Mathias Kneubühler, Dominik Brunner, Alain Geiger

Swiss Commission for Remote Sensing,
Swiss Geodetic Commission

During the symposium we expect overviews and in-depth presentations on state-of-the-art Earth Observation methods used for measuring the spheres of the Earth.

Recent advances in characterizing spheres and their interaction within the system Earth using remote sensing will be discussed and presented. Emphasis will be on coupled systems, chemical, biological and physical constituents mapping on land, atmosphere, ocean, as well as the solid Earth.

Furthermore, teams considering GNSS are encouraged to present their developments and applications. Monitoring aspects such as Essential Climate Variables (ECVs), supporting missions and programs from national and international organizations and agencies are invited to be presented, too..

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19. Geoscience and Geoinformation – From data acquisition to modelling and visualisation

Nils Oesterling, Massimiliano Cannata, Michael Sinreich

Georesources Switzerland Group
Swiss Geodetic Commission
Swiss Geophysical Commission
Swiss Hydrogeological Society

Digital data acquisition and 3D visualisation of geospatial objects and processes are already standard and are still gaining increasingly importance in geosciences. For instance geodetic data capture in combination with digital geological mapping constitutes an important basis for various tasks in engineering geology, natural hazard prevention and other geoscientific fields. Moreover, 3D modelling, GIS handling and visualisation of such data gives a better understanding of the respective problem setting.

In this symposium papers related to geospatial applications in all geosciences (geodesy, geophysics, geology, hydrogeology, engineering geology, geomorphology, etc.) will be presented. The focus will be on the following topics:

    • Development and application of digital tools for data capture
    • Transformation from field data to digital datasets and time series
    • Digital geological mapping and geoscientific information systems
    • 3D modelling, analysis of temporal variations and visualisation of geospatial objects and processes

Methodological papers as well as thematic case studies will be discussed. Contributions related to the topic of the 17th SGM Plenary Session « Geoscience goes underground: understanding resources & processes», e.g. data capture and analysis of sub-surface data, modelling of structures and processes in the underground are especially welcome this year

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20. Taking stock of transformative research and education on mountains. What future avenues?

Emmanuel Reynard, Iago Otero, Carolina Adler, Jörg Balsiger

Interdisciplinary Centre for Mountain Research
Forum Landscape, Alps, Parks (FOLAP)
Mountain Research Initiative

The integration of scientific disciplines and lay knowledge in adaptive governance networks spanning across scales has been stressed as crucial for facilitating transformations to sustainability. However, despite decades of research in this domain, key interdependencies and complexities of environmental problems have not been sufficiently accounted to explore the solutions space. Mountain regions are becoming increasingly vulnerable to climate and other processes of global change, with negative consequences for social-ecological systems far beyond the immediate mountain setting. New, effective research approaches that build on past achievements are needed to contribute to the sustainable development of mountains.

In order to contribute to addressing this challenge, this symposium aims at 1) taking stock of the inter- and trans-disciplinary transformative research, education and training on mountain regions conducted so far (methods, theories, best practices, challenges), and 2) defining what should be the priority research and training avenues for the immediate future (e.g. research questions, methods of inter- and trans-disciplinary collaboration, transformation accelerators, skills and capacity building, among others). We welcome contributions from the natural sciences, engineering, social sciences and humanities that deal with these topics in mountain regions of both Switzerland and the world. Sub-topics include but are not limited to societal learning, adaptation to climate change, governance, wellbeing, management of resources and hazards, tourism, mobility, and land-planning.

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21. Human Geographies: Bodies, Cultures, Societies

Karine Duplan, Elisabeth Militz

Swiss Association for Geography (ASG)

The symposium provides room for timely and innovative research across critical social and cultural geographies. The string of panel sessions invites empirically grounded contributions and/or theoretical as well as methodological interventions from students, doctoral candidates, postdocs, lecturers and professors addressing one of the following four themes:

    • Visual geographies
    • Intimate technologies, bodies and space
    • Transnational experiences of everyday spaces
    • Power, intersectionality and space

An invited keynote lecture by a renowned international speaker and an informal get-together following the panel sessions will complete the program.

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22. Human Geographies: Cities, Regions, Economies

Christian Berndt, Laurent Matthey, Martin Müller

Swiss Association for Geography (ASG)

Not so long ago, triumphant declarations of the arrival of an ‘urban age’ and of regions as the new players in a world economy, bound together by ever tighter networks and circulations of commodities, images and capital, seemed to herald a new era. Today, the new wave of economic nationalism and the reassertion of the national state throughout the world necessitates if not a revision then at least a re-assessment of that diagnosis.

This symposium invites proposals for sessions that situate themselves in a critical examination of cities, regions and economies at different scale levels, from the body to the city all the way to the globe. We welcome sessions across a broad range of theoretical perspectives and with an empirical scope ranging from the Global North to the Global South and East.

Possible themes include (but are not limited to):

    • More-than-human cities
    • Assembled and networked cities
    • Risk, uncertainty and improvisation
    • Thinking with the South/East
    • Urbanism of the spectacle
    • Mobilities (of policies, images, practices, capital, …)
    • Postcolonial urbanism
    • Feminist urban and economic geographies
    • Ordinary urban events and the making of the city
    • Writing urban space : from narratives to counter narratives
    • Under-planned sites
    • Metropolisation in the Global South

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23. Human Geographies: Materials, Natures, Politics

Rony EmmeneggerJevgeniy Bluwstein

Swiss Association for Geography (ASG)

Global environmental change reveals the complexity of nature-society relations at and across different scales. Against this background, human geographers have come to analyze the manifold ways in which human life is entangled with its material environment. This symposium brings together a series of sessions to address the complexity, ambiguity and uncertainty of human-environment relations, both empirically and theoretically. Paying close attention to how the social is intermingled with biogeophysical processes, the symposium aims to shed light on the geo-politics and bio-politics of different socio-natures in the Anthropocene.

We welcome session proposals with a focus on themes such as (but not limited to) the following:

    • Environmental extraction, resources and waste
    • Environmental security, risks and hazards
    • Environmental governance, politics and governmentality
    • Environmental ethics, histories and futures

We also welcome contributions from scholars with interdisciplinary and integrative scopes, as well as transdisciplinary contributions that address changing human-environment interfaces.

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24. The limits to Earth: thinking social-ecological transitions in a post-extractive economy

Patrick Bottazzi, Sebastien Boillat

While world population and consumption is steadily growing, most underground resources such as fossil fuels, minerals and rare earths are finite. This symposium takes the assumption that the decline of non-renewable underground resources will have dramatic and irremediable effects on the present economic systems, despite any technical progress expected in the coming decades. Additionally, a growing number of experts predict that pushing the use of underground resources to their physical end will lead to unprecedented transformations of the Earth system including global state shifts and multiple systemic collapses. Many researches are documenting the risks of the current over-extracting trend at a global scale but very few take the measures of their consequences on our everyday life in the middle term.  How would societies look like in a post-extractive economy? What are the anticipation and possible adaptation strategies? What are the possible transitions to a less chaotic scenario?

These are just suggestions of possible sub-topics:

    • Food systems, agroecology and labour in the post-extractive turn
    • Socio-technical transitions, systemic lock-in and leverage points
    • Energy transition, “low tech” and human labour in a “green economy”
    • “Collapsology”, art and imagination of unpredictable futures
    • Waste as resource, circular economy and the challenge of entropy
    • Geopolitics of (non-)renewable energy and materials
    • The finance-oil nexus and systemic risks
    • Mutual aid and the value-spirit in a post-material economy

Other related topics are welcomed…

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25. Towards the sustainable management and governance of land resources and land systems

Chinwe Ifejika Speranza, Desiree Daniel, Chidiebere Ofoegbu, Ademola Adenle

The conditions of above- and below ground resources play a critical role in ecosystem functioning and in providing various ecosystem services. Not only do we derive our food from land as a spatial resource, from soils, water, vegetation and other natural resources, but also human health and various local and national economies depend on the conditions of these above and belowground natural resources. Hence understanding the ways through which such resources are managed and governed, ranging from biophysical and technological measures, to their political economy and the institutional arrangements framing their use, is important. Such understanding provides a basis for identifying pathways to setting targets for their sustainable use and for elaborating transformation pathways towards achieving this goal. A major question addressed by contributions to this session is what are the conditions of the focus-above- and belowground resources, their political economies and governance arrangements, how to identify the sustainable use of above and below ground natural resources. In line with the theme of this year “Geoscience goes underground: understanding resources & processes”, this session welcomes contributions that address these and other questions related to the conditions, management and governance of above- and below ground resources.

SGM 2018 Bern