SYMPOSIA SESSION

  1. Structural Geology, Tectonics and Geodynamics
  2. Mineralogy, Petrology, Geochemistry
  3. Non-traditional stable isotope geochemistry: development and applications
  4. Gemmology
  5. Palaeontology
  6. Stratigraphy
  7. Seismic Hazard and Risk in Switzerland: From Science to Mitigation
  8. Earthquakes from the field to the laboratory
  9. Shale-Gas, CO2 Storage and Deep Geothermal Energy
  10. Celebrating 50 Years of International Ocean Drilling (1968-2018)
  11. Quaternary environments: landscapes, climate, ecosystems and human activity during the past 2.6 million years
  12. Geomorphology for a habitable planet
  13. Cryospheric Sciences
  14. Hydrology, Limnology and Hydrogeology
  15. The new Climate Change Scenarios CH2018
  16. Climate Change Education and Outreach
  17. Aerosols and clouds in a changing world
  18. Atmospheric Processes and Interactions with the Biosphere
  19. Environmental Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements
  20. Remote Sensing of the Spheres
  21. Geoscience and Geoinformation – From data acquisition to modelling and visualisation
  22. Human Geographies
  23. Sustainable social-ecological systems: from local to global challenges

 

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1. Structural Geology, Tectonics and Geodynamics.

Guido Schreurs, Neil Mancktelow, Paul Tackley, Daniel Egli

Swiss Tectonics Studies Group of the Swiss Geological Society

Presentations are invited considering structural geology, tectonics, and geodynamics, including field, experimental and model studies of structures at all scales. The session should also provide a forum for interdisciplinary contributions studying the interplay between surface processes, topography and tectonics. Young researchers are particularly encouraged to participate and present their results.

 

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2. Mineralogy, Petrology, Geochemistry

Sébastien Pilet, Bernard Grobéty, Eric Reusser

Swiss Society of Mineralogy and Petrology (SSMP)

This session aims to provide a platform for research reports in all fields related to mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry that are not covered by other sessions (e.g. experimental petrology, volcanology, analytical approaches etc.). Furthermore, it provides a platform to young scientists that want to report about the results of their PhD/master projects. It is planned to have an accompanying poster session.

 

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3. Non-traditional stable isotope geochemistry: development and applications

Afifé El Korh, Andres Rüggeberg

Analytical improvements in the domain of mass spectrometry (e.g. MC-ICPMS, SIMS, TIMS) over the past twenty years have allowed the development of protocols for precise, accurate and representative measurements of non-traditional stable isotopes (or “metal stable isotopes”; e.g. Li, B, Mg, Ca, Fe, V, Cr, Zn, Ba, Mo, Ni, Tl, U). The growth of non-traditional stable isotope database has improved significantly our understanding of the mechanisms controlling metal isotope fractionation during various geochemical processes, as they can fractionate at both low- and high-temperature. Therefore, non-traditional stable isotope systems became powerful tools in geochemistry and are employed as tracers of natural processes in various domains of Earth Sciences (including geochemistry of magmatic and metamorphic rocks, sedimentology, cosmochemistry, environmental geochemistry and biogeochemistry).

This session is open to contributions investigating the modes and mechanisms of non-traditional stable isotope fractionation, and to applications using non-traditional stable isotopes to explore surface and deep Earth geochemical processes.

 

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4. Gemmology

Michael S. Krzemnicki, Laurent E. Cartier

Swiss Gemmological Society (SGG),
Swiss Society of Mineralogy and Petrology (SSMP)

This session will cover all aspects related to coloured gemstones, diamonds and pearls. We will cover the geological formation of different gemstone deposits and mining processes required to extract precious gemstones. Origin determination of gemstones and treatments of gemstones will be an important focus, along with the geochemical and spectroscopic techniques used to analyse these questions. Biomineralisation of organic gem materials such as corals and pearls will also be addressed.

 

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5. Palaeontology

Christian Klug, Torsten Scheyer, Lionel Cavin

Schweizerische Paläontologische Gesellschaft,
Kommission des Schweizerischen Paläontologischen Abhandlungen (KSPA)

This session is dedicated to all subdisciplines of palaeontology in Switzerland and all other countries.

Presentations and posters may deal with macro- and microfossils, all major clades including prokaryotes, eucaryotes, Metazoans, plants etc. Preferred topics are evolution, biostratigraphy, palaeobiogeography, palaeoecology including palaeoclimate, bio-events, evo-devo, but results from other fields may be presented as well. Fossils provide essential data to document the history of life and evolution; index fossils provide important data for stratigraphic correlations; recently, fossils (especially of plants) have been widely used in research on palaeoclimate.

Session language is English.

 

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6. Stratigraphy

Alain Morard, Reto Burkhalter, Oliver Kempf & Ursula Menkveld-Gfeller

Swiss Commitee for Stratigraphy (SKS/CSS),
Swiss Palaeontological Society (SPG/SPS),

This session is dedicated to the presentation and discussion of new results from all stratigraphic subdisciplines: lithostratigraphy, chronostratigraphy, chemostratigraphy, sequence stratigraphy, … As concerns biostratigraphic contributions, a coordinated program will be established with the paleontology session (please submit your abstract there in this case).

Talks and posters on specific regional questions, broader scale correlations and reconstitutions, as well as on new methodological developments, are most welcome.

 

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7. Seismic Hazard and Risk in Switzerland: From Science to Mitigation

Donat Fäh, Katrin Beyer, Blaise Duvernay

Earthquake risk mitigation in Switzerland started about 20 years ago. Since then, several important steps have been taken towards a more systematic implementation of preventive and preparation measures. Scientific studies from different research fields formed the base for decision-making, but much remains to be done. On-going research includes the estimation and consequences of strong ground shaking, the assessment and improvement of engineered structures, as well as studies on potential earthquake-triggered mass movements, liquefaction in alluvial plains and tsunamis in lakes. We invite researchers working in the fields of seismic hazard, vulnerability and risk to contribute to this session.

The session covers all earthquake-related research topics in natural sciences, structural and civil engineering, and social sciences, and aims at bringing together researchers with practitioners, specialists from industry, and decision makers from cantonal and federal offices.

 

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8. Earthquakes from the field to the laboratory

Matteo Lupi, Marie Violay, François X. Passelègue

The aim of this session is to focus interdisciplinary research efforts investigating earthquake-related processes from the laboratory to the field scale. The session calls for contributions from the field of Rock Mechanics, Seismology, Tectonics and Numerical Modelling.

In particular, we welcome studies related to: i) the understanding of fracturing and frictional processes; ii) innovative techniques involving high-speed imaging and continuous acoustic emission streaming data; iii) fluid-rock interaction including earthquake induced/triggered processes in shallow and deep geological environments; iv) understanding earthquake energy budget partitioning.

Given the energetic transition towards sustainable resources promoted by Switzerland we also call for experimental and field studies on induced seismicity and insights on earthquake hazard mitigation, including public acceptance. We particularly encourage contributions from early career scientists.

 

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9. Shale-Gas, CO2 Storage and Deep Geothermal Energy

Lyesse Laloui, Larryn Diamond, Paul Bossart,

Swiss Geothermal Society,
Swiss Association of Energy Geoscientists (SASEG)

This symposiumdeals with research and exploration of the sub-surface geology for the energy sector, and focusses on 3 topics: shale gas, carbon sequestration and deep geothermal energy.

Shale gas is natural gas that is trapped within shale formations. Horizontal drilling is often performed where hydraulic fracturing (fracking) is applied to create extensive artificial fractures around the borehole, followed by the release of the gases into the borehole.

Carbon sequestration describes long-term storage of carbon dioxide or other forms of carbon in geological formations. It is a method to slow down greenhouse gases, which are mainly released by burning fossil fuels.

Geothermal heat extracted from depth in excess of 400 meters is defined as deep geothermal energy . The heat is extracted by hot-dry-rock processes or by drilling into aquifers or tectonic faults.

Presentations related to these 3 topics are kindly invited. This includes field exploration work, lab experiments and modelling studies at all scales, but also work dealing with legal aspects is welcomed.

 

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10. Celebrating 50 Years of International Ocean Drilling (1968-2018)

Silvia Spezzaferri, Gretchen Früh-Green, Marc Lever, Judith McKenzie, Helmut Weissert, Andrea Moscariello and Flavio Anselmetti

Swiss Commission of Oceanography and Limnology, SWISS DRILLING

The successful completion of scientific drilling operations on the RV Glomar Challenger during Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) Leg 1 in the Gulf of Mexico and western North Atlantic in September 1968 marks the beginning of the 50-year saga of one of the most successful international scientific programs. Beginning with DSDP Leg 3, Swiss scientists have been very active in the planning and execution of the scientific drilling program during its 50-year history as the program evolved from DSDP to ODP and IODP.

The initial goal of DSDP was to test the rapidly evolving plate tectonics/sea-floor spreading hypothesis with a specifically designed drilling program, but the focus soon moved to other topics, such as biostratigraphy, paleoceanography, paleoclimatology and Earth systems history. Petrology and geochemistry of oceanic lithosphere became new targets of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and, subsequently, geobiology and geomicrobiology of the deep biosphere were introduced with the initiation of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP).

The current drilling program, the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), has broadened the drilling target with the introduction of the theme “Earth in Motion”, including the investigation of processes and hazards on human time scales. All of these ocean drilling research topics are, or have been, the focus of many scientific projects in Switzerland. The Swiss scientific community will celebrate the 50thanniversary of scientific ocean drilling with a dedicated symposium at the Swiss Geoscience Meeting in Bern.

We invite presentations focusing on results stemming from the international ocean drilling program in all fields and throughout its 50-year history, with a particular emphasis on the contributions of Swiss scientists.

 

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11. Quaternary environments: landscapes, climate, ecosystems, human activity during the past 2.6 million years

Naki Akçar, Christine Pümpin, Stéphanie Girardclos, Gaudenz Deplazes, Stephanie Wirth, Jean Nicolas Haas, René Löpfe, Loren Eggenschwiler

Swiss Society for Quaternary Research (CH-QUAT)

During the Quaternary Period, the last 2.6 million years of Earth’s history, changes in environments and climate shaped human evolution. In particular, large-scale features of atmospheric circulation patterns varied significantly due to the dramatic changes in global boundary conditions which accompanied abrupt changes in climate.

Past variations in the geosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and in climate were archived in Quaternary deposits and provide critical information for the interpretation of present and future environmental changes. Quaternary research focuses on understanding these changes in environmental conditions, and on assessing their impact on landscapes, ecosystems, and human societies.

Within this context, this session brings together scientists from diverse disciplines in Earth Science, Archaeology and Environmental Science. In addition to studies focusing on the reconstruction and impact of past environmental change, we also invite presentations focusing on human expansions and cultural development, and contributions to methodological improvements in climate proxy studies or in methods of age determination. Topics may include all aspects of Quaternary science and we strongly encourage students and young scientists to present the results of their ongoing research.

 

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12. Geomorphology for a habitable planet

Nikolaus Kuhn, Christoph Graf, Isabell Kull, Geraldine Regolini, Isabelle Gärtner-Roer, Margreth Keiler, Christophe Lambiel, Christian Scapozza, Reynald Delaloye, Negar Haghipour

Swiss Geomorphological Society (SGmS)

The Swiss Geomorphological Society (SGmS) invites people from research and practice to present their geomorphologic work at the 16th Swiss Geoscience Meeting. Young scientists are particularly encouraged to take the opportunity of submitting their theses and fostering relationships with colleagues.

The topic of the 2018 Swiss Geoscience Meeting A habitable planet closely relates to the study of Earth’s surface processes, forms, materials and the evolution of landscapes conducted by geomorphologists. Form and processes of the Earth surface affect the planet’s patterns of habitats, the provision and access to environmental services, and the exposure to natural hazards. As scientists and practitioners, often in close collaboration with related disciplines, geomorphologists try to gain an understanding of the dynamic surface of the Earth and the associated impacts on geosystems and societies.

In particular, questions such as resource management (water, soil, Earth materials), ecological networks sensu lato (ecosystems, geodiversity, biodiversity), or the safety and security of territory and human population (hazards, risks, exposure, health, agriculture, forests, changing climate) are studied in geomorphology. Understanding our relationship with the Earth surface is even more relevant in times of severe environmental change. Looking at other planets, geomorphology also contributes to deciphering their past or present habitability.

Therefore, the conveners of the session Geomorphology for a habitable planet at the 16th Swiss Geoscience Meeting encourage contributions from all areas of basic and applied geomorphology, including studies of the past and present processes and their implications for the habitability of Earth, the influence of global change and how it may influence the Earth’s surface, natural hazards and resources in the future.

 

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13. Cryospheric Sciences

Margit Schwikowski, Martin Heggli, Matthias Huss, Jeannette Nötzli, Daniel Tobler, Andreas Vieli

Swiss Snow, Ice and Permafrost Society

This session addresses all topics, which are related to the Alpine and Polar Cryosphere. We expect contributions covering the whole range of Alpine and Polar snow, ice and permafrost research.

We encourage theoretical, experimental as well as practical contributions, especially from young researchers. Presentations that address the aspects of dynamics and thermodynamics of snow, ice and permafrost and impacts related to natural hazards are particularly welcomed.

 

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14. Hydrology, Limnology and Hydrogeology

Massimiliano Zappa, Michael Doering, Tobias Jonas, Michael Sinreich, Bettina Schaefli

Swiss Society for Hydrology and Limnology SGHL,
Swiss Hydrological Commission CHy,
Swiss Hydrogeological Society SGH

The session is open to contributions dealing with hydrology, limnology and hydrogeology at all scales, including contributions demonstrating interdisciplinary approaches.

This year particularly welcome are topics dealing with mountain regions and with implications of environmental change.

 

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15. The new Climate Change Scenarios CH2018

Stefan Brönnimann, Andreas Fischer, Kuno Strassmann

Swiss Association of Geographers (ASG)
Commission for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)

The new climate change scenarios CH2018 are being launched in November 2018. They provide an up-to-date assessment of expected future changes in Switzerland and give users a wide range of tailored data as a reference for adaptation planning and decision-making.

This session discusses new insights of the CH2018 scenarios and invites contributions related to the development, use and dissemination of the new scenarios. This is an excellent opportunity to present first application examples based on CH2018 data and to exchange the gained experiences. We also welcome presentations on future directions of national climate change scenarios with respect to regional climate modeling, statistical downscaling and user interactions.

 

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16. Climate Change Education and Outreach

Moritz Gubler, Marco Adamina, Matthias Probst, Peter Stucki

Swiss Association of Geographers (ASG)
Swiss Association for Geographic Education (VGDch)

Despite being one of the most important societal challenges of the 21st century, public as well as individual engagement with climate change mitigation and adaption remains relatively low. In order to overcome the various hurdles regarding the successful and sustainable transfer from knowledge to action, educational, psychological, and social sciences play a key role in providing the theoretical and practical instruments for the empowerment of the general public.

This session aims at bringing together multi-perspective insights into challenges and opportunities regarding the communication and education of climate change. We welcome contributions from a broad range of disciplines (i.e. education, psychology, pedagogics, philosophy, social sciences) focussing on the perception, processing, communication, application, learning and education of information and knowledge associated with climate change. Talks and posters may relate to all age levels (i.e. primary, secondary, tertiary), approaches (i.e. theoretical vs. practical, quantitative vs. qualitative), and scales (i.e. local, national, global).

We encourage submissions of past, ongoing and planned projects originating from Switzerland or abroad in either English, German, French or Italian. Contributions from young scientists (MSc- or PhD projects) as well as interdisciplinary projects are especially welcomed.

 

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17. Aerosols and clouds in a changing world

Christopher Hoyle, Ulrich Krieger

ACP – Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry

This session covers all topics related to aerosols, clouds and their interactions. Topics include for example, the chemistry and physics of aerosol formation and growth, the influence of aerosols on cloud formation and properties, chemical reactions occurring in aerosol particles and cloud droplets, aerosol formation from anthropogenic activities, and the role of the biosphere in aerosol production.

 

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18. Atmospheric Processes and Interactions with the Biosphere

Christof Ammann, Stefan Brönnimann, Susanne Burri, Martin Steinbacher

ACP – Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics,

The aim of this session is to provide a platform for research reports from all fields related to atmospheric sciences including biosphere–atmosphere exchange and interactions.

The session welcomes contributions that focus on relevant aspects of atmospheric, surface, or ecosystem processes, which either influence atmospheric composition and climate or are influenced by them. Exchange and feedback processes are of key interest, but also case studies of specific chemical, physical or ecosystem processes are welcome, as well as insights from long-term monitoring and larger research infrastructures like ICOS-CH (Integrated Carbon Observation System, Switzerland).

The session is suited to researchers working in the field of Climate Sciences, Atmospheric Physics and Chemistry, Physical Geography, Meteorology, Ecology and Agricultural Sciences. We especially encourage young scientists to present their Master theses or PhD projects, either in the oral or in the accompanying poster session.

 

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19. Environmental Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements

Moritz Bigalke, Montserrat Filella, Adrien Mestrot, Andreas Voegelin, Lenny Winkel

Trace elements play crucial roles in aquatic and terrestrial environments as growth-limiting nutrients, but also as highly toxic or radioactive compounds. Trace elements derived from both natural and anthropogenic sources may thus critically affect ecosystem functioning and productivity as well as human health.

The environmental fate and impact of trace elements are controlled by their speciation and the intimate coupling of abiotic and biotic transformation processes at different scales, and are closely linked to the biogeochemical cycling of other elements such as Fe, Mn, Ca, P, S, or C.

To advance the state of knowledge on the biogeochemistry of trace elements from the molecular to the global scale, state-of-the-art analytical methods such as hyphenated and isotope techniques, synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopies, electron microscopies as well as (bio)geochemical and geostatistical modeling approaches can be used.

For this session, we invite contributions concerned with (bio)geochemical processes and their effects on trace element speciation, mobility, bioavailability, toxicity and distribution in natural and engineered environmental systems on different scales.

 

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20. Remote Sensing of the Spheres

Stefan Wunderle, Mathias Kneubühler, Dominik Brunner, Alain Geiger

Swiss Commission for Remote Sensing,
Swiss Geodetic Commission

During the symposium we expect overviews and in-depth presentations on state-of-the-art Earth Observation methods used for measuring the spheres of the Earth.

Recent advances in characterizing spheres and their interaction within the system Earth using remote sensing will be discussed and presented. Emphasis will be on coupled systems, chemical, biological and physical constituents mapping on land, atmosphere, ocean, as well as the solid Earth.

Furthermore, teams considering GNSS are encouraged to present their developments and applications. Monitoring aspects such as Essential Climate Variables (ECVs), supporting missions and programs from national and international organizations and agencies are invited to be presented, too.

 

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21. Geoscience and Geoinformation – From data acquisition to modelling and visualisation

Nils Oesterling, Adrian Wiget, Massimiliano Cannata, Michael Sinreich

Swiss Geodetic Commission,
Swiss Geotechnical Commission,
Swiss Geophysical Commission,
Swiss Hydrogeological Society

Digital data acquisition and 3D visualisation of geospatial objects and processes are already standard and are still gaining increasingly importance in geosciences. For instance geodetic data capture in combination with digital geological mapping constitutes an important basis for various tasks in engineering geology, natural hazard prevention and other geoscientific fields. Moreover, 3D modelling, GIS handling and visualisation of such data gives a better understanding of the respective problem setting.

In this symposium papers related to geospatial applications in all geosciences (geodesy, geophysics, geology, hydrogeology, engineering geology, geomorphology, etc.) will be presented. The focus will be on the following topics::

  • Development and application of digital tools for data capture
  • Transformation from field data to digital datasets and time series
  • Digital geological mapping and geoscientific information systems
  • 3D modelling, analysis of temporal variations and visualisation of geospatial objects and processes

Methodological papers as well as thematic case studies will be discussed. Contributions related to the topic of the 16th SGM Plenary Session «A Habitable Planet», e.g. monitoring and analysis of processes in the geo-, bio- and atmosphere are especially welcome this year.

 

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22. Human Geographies

Martin Müller, Jevgeniy Bluwstein, Karine Duplan, Olivier Graefe, Francisco Klauser, Christian Kull, Rafael Matos-Wasem, Elisabeth Militz, Patrick Rérat

Swiss Association for Geography (ASG)

The string of panels in this session explores cutting-edge research across the discipline of human geography. It is open for theoretical explorations and empirical studies alike. Papers are invited to focus on one of four sub-themes:

  • Political Natures
  • Economies, Territories, Development
  • Cities, Mobilities, Materialities
  • Bodies, Space and Difference

Given the nature of the field, this will all be paper sessions with a maximum of four papers per session.

An invited lecture by a renowned international speaker and a career workshop for early-career researchers will complete the program.

 

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23. Sustainable social-ecological systems: from local to global challenges

Chinwe Ifejika Speranza, Sébastien Boillat, MD Sarwar Hossain Sohel

Sustainability science deals with the interactions between the natural and the social systems and seeks to assess who these interactions affect the challenge of sustainability, namely to meet the needs of present and future generations while reducing poverty and conserving ecosystems. Such interactions have been conceptualized as nature-society interactions, social-ecological systems, biophysical-social systems or coupled human-environment systems.

Sustainability science spans across many disciplines within and between social and natural science and is therefore multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary. Because it seeks to contribute to transform society and combines fundamental and applied knowledge, it is also transdisciplinary.

In this session, our objective is to gather contributions that deal with core questions of sustainability by addressing social-ecological interactions, including:

  • Long-term trends and transitions in interactions between ecological and social systems
  • Risk and resilience in social-ecological systems
  • Theories and models of social-ecological systems, e.g. safe and just operating space
  • Distant social-ecological interactions, e.g. “telecouplings”
  • Sustainable management of land systems
  • Sustainability assessments and trade-offs between human-wellbeing and environmental sustainability

We welcome contributions from junior and senior scholars with interdisciplinary and integrative scopes, as well as transdisciplinary contributions that address transformations to sustainability at the science-society interface.

 

SGM 2017 Davos