SYMPOSIA SESSION

  1. Structural Geology, Tectonics and Geodynamics
  2. Mineralogy, Petrology, Geochemistry
  3. Palaeontology
  4. Stratigraphy
  5. Shale-Gas, CO2 Storage and Deep Geothermal Energy
  6. Progress in assessment of hazards and risks in mountain regions
  7. Geomorphology
  8. Quaternary environments: landscapes, climate, ecosystems, human activity during the past 2.6 million years
  9. Cryospheric Sciences
  10. Hydrology, Limnology and Hydrogeology
  11. Environmental Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements
  12. Atmospheric Processes and Interactions with the Biosphere
  13. Aerosols and clouds in a changing world
  14. Remote Sensing of the Spheres
  15. High alpine remote sensing
  16. Geoscience and Geoinformation – From data acquisition to modelling and visualisation

 

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1. Structural Geology, Tectonics and Geodynamics.

Guido Schreurs, Neil Mancktelow, Paul Tackley, Daniel Egli

Swiss Tectonics Studies Group of the Swiss Geological Society

Presentations are invited considering structural geology, tectonics, and geodynamics, including field, experimental and model studies of structures at all scales. The session should also provide a forum for interdisciplinary contributions studying the interplay between surface processes, topography and tectonics. Young researchers are particularly encouraged to participate and present their results.

 

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2. Mineralogy, Petrology, Geochemistry

Sébastien Pilet, Bernard Grobéty, Eric Reusser

Swiss Society of Mineralogy and Petrology (SSMP)

This session aims to provide a platform for research reports in all fields related to mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry that are not covered by other sessions (e.g. experimental petrology, volcanology, analytical approaches etc.). Furthermore, it provides a platform to young scientists that want to report about the results of their PhD/master projects. It is planned to have an accompanying poster session.

 

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3. Palaeontology

Christian Klug, Torsten Scheyer, Lionel Cavin

Schweizerische Paläontologische Gesellschaft,
Kommission des Schweizerischen Paläontologischen Abhandlungen (KSPA)

This session is dedicated to all subdisciplines of palaeontology in Switzerland and all other countries.

Presentations and posters may deal with macro- and microfossils, all major caldes including prokaryotes, eucaryotes, metazoans, plants etc. Preferred topics are evolution, biostratigraphy, palaeobiogeography, palaeoecology including palaeoclimate, bio-events, evo-devo, but results from other fields may be presented as well. Fossils provide essential data to document the history of life and evolution; index fossils provide important data for stratigraphic correlations; recently, fossils (especially of plants) have been widely used in research on palaeoclimate.

Session language is English.

 

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4. Stratigraphy

Alain Morard, Reto Burkhalter, Oliver Kempf & Ursula Menkveld-Gfeller

Swiss Commitee for Stratigraphy (SKS/CSS),
Swiss Palaeontological Society (SPG/SPS),

This session is dedicated to the presentation and discussion of new results from all stratigraphic subdisciplines: lithostratigraphy, chronostratigraphy, chemostratigraphy, sequence stratigraphy, … As concerns biostratigraphic contributions, a coordinated program will be established with the paleontology session (please submit your abstract there in this case).

Talks and posters on specific regional questions, broader scale correlations and reconstitutions, as well as on new methodological developments, are most welcome

 

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5. Shale-Gas, CO2 Storage and Deep Geothermal Energy

Lyesse Laloui, Larryn Diamond, Paul Bossart,

Swiss Geothermal Society,
Swiss Association of Energy Geoscientists (SASEG)

This symposium deals with research and exploration of the sub-surface geology for the energy sector, and focusses on 3 topics: shale gas, carbon sequestration and deep geothermal energy. The goal is to share experience and knowledge gained from those geo-energy fields. Furthermore, it explores the potential scientific directions in order to tackle particular challenges, methods and tools that can secure future energy demands and provide environmental friendly development solutions.

Shale gas is natural gas that is formed and trapped within shale formations that are characterized by a consistent amount of organic content. The very low porosity, permeability and pore size of the material and thus the high capillary forces developed, enhance the fluid and gas trapping. As a consequence the hydraulic fracturing (fracking) technique is applied to create extensive artificial fractures in the shale formation which enhance the rate of the gas extraction. The control of the propagation of the hydraulic fractures is of major concern to guarantee the safety of the overlaying aquifers: the developed micro-seismicity is often used to monitor the fractures’ extent. Horizontal drilling is often performed where the hydraulic fracturing technique is applied. The drilling of deep vertical and horizontal wells in shales comes along with issues concerning wellbore stability and sand production, together with problems related to wastewaters and gas leakages control. The chemical composition of the drilling and fracturing fluids and their interaction with the shale environment is also of major concern.

Carbon sequestration describes long-term storage of carbon dioxide or other forms of carbon in geological formations. It is a method to slow down greenhouse gases, which are mainly released by burning fossil fuels. The symposium will address the state of the art activities with emphasis on the integrity of geological storage system, through subsurface formation characterization, CO2 storage capacity, reservoir stability, monitoring technology, implementation and risk management methodology and environmental impact of CO2 storage.
Geothermal heat extracted from depth in excess of 400 meters is defined as deep geothermal energy. The heat is extracted by hot-dry-rock processes or by drilling into aquifers or tectonic faults.

Presentations related to these 3 topics are kindly invited. This includes field exploration work, lab experiments and modelling studies at all scales, but also work dealing with legal aspects is welcomed.

 

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6. Progress in assessment of hazards and risks in mountain regions

Michael Bründl, Linda Zaugg, Markus Stoffel

High gradients of elevation, dynamic processes, and limited space are the reasons that various hazards affect societies and their assets in Alpine regions. Extreme events and resulting damage in the past years revealed that dealing with hazard and risks has to be continuously improved and adapted to cope with challenges caused by climate change effects and socio-economic changes. This session aims at bringing together researchers with innovative ideas in terms of hazard and risk assessments as well as in the modeling of hazards in mountain regions. Processes to be addressed are gravitation-driven, single-hazard processes such as snow avalanches, debris flows, rockfall and landslides or multi-hazard processes (e.g., process chains). The main goal is to present recent progress, to identify gaps in knowledge and to discuss future work necessary to enable sustainable development in mountain regions.

We especially encourage young scientists to submit and present their research.

 

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7. Geomorphology

Nikolaus Kuhn, Christoph Graf, Isabell Kull, Geraldine Regolini, Isabelle Gärtner-Roer, Sébastien Castelltort, Margreth Keiler, Christophe Lambiel, Christian Scapozza, Reynald Delaloye, Christine Levy

Swiss Geomorphological Society (SGS)
Swiss Association of Geographers (ASG)

The topic of the 2017 Swiss Geoscience Meeting “Moving boundaries” closely relates to the study of surface processes, forms, materials and evolution of landscapes conducted by geomorphologists. Changing the topography of the surface of the Earth literally affects boundaries, but in a more subtle way processes in the past, present and future, as well as the associated properties of the surface of the Earth affect patterns e.g. of habitats, the provision and access to environmental services, or the exposure to natural hazards. Geomorphologists, as scientists and practitioners, often in close collaboration with related disciplines, study the dynamics surface of the Earth and the associated impacts on geosystems, as well as societies.

This open session on geomorphology at the 15th Swiss Geoscience Meeting encourages contributions from all areas of basic and applied geomorphology, including studies of the past and present processes and, for example, the implications for natural hazards, the influence on shaping the present landscape or landforms, or the influence of global change and how that may influence the processes, natural hazards, and resources in the future. Based on this year’s meeting theme “Moving boundaries”, contributions focusing on this key-geomorphological issue will be preferred.

The Swiss Geomorphological Society (SGmS) invites people from science and practice to present their geomorphologic interests and results in oral or poster presentations. Young scientists are encouraged particularly to take the opportunity of presenting their theses and fostering relationships with colleague.

 

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8. Quaternary environments: landscapes, climate, ecosystems, human activity during the past 2.6 million years

Naki Akçar, Christine Pümpin, Stéphanie Girardclos, Gaudenz Deplazes, Stephanie Wirth, Jean Nicolas Haas, René Löpfe, Loren Eggenschwiler

Swiss Society for Quaternary Research (CH-QUAT)

During the Quaternary Period, the last 2.6 million years of Earth’s history, changes in environments and climate shaped human evolution. Large-scale features of atmospheric circulation patterns varied significantly due to the dramatic changes in global boundary conditions, which accompanied abrupt changes in climate.

Past variations in the geosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and in climate were archived in Quaternary deposits and provide critical information for the interpretation of present and future environmental changes. Quaternary research focuses on understanding these changes in environmental conditions, and on assessing their impact on landscapes, ecosystems, and human societies.

Within this context, the session brings together scientists from diverse disciplines in Earth Science, Archaeology and Environmental Science. In addition to studies focusing on the reconstruction and impact of past environmental change, we also invite presentations focusing on human expansions and cultural development, and contributions to methodological improvements in climate proxy studies or in methods of age determination. Topics may include all aspects of Quaternary science and we strongly encourage students and young scientists to present the results of their ongoing research.

 

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9. Cryospheric Sciences

Margit Schwikowski, Martin Heggli, Matthias Huss, Jeannette Nötzli, Daniel Tobler, Andreas Vieli

Swiss Snow, Ice and Permafrost Society

This session addresses all topics, which are related to the Alpine and Polar Cryosphere. We expect contributions covering the whole range of Alpine and Polar snow, ice and permafrost research.

We encourage theoretical, experimental as well as practical contributions, especially from young researchers. Presentations that address the aspects of dynamics and thermodynamics of snow, ice and permafrost and impacts related to natural hazards are particularly welcomed.

This year a special sub-session will be included to celebrate the 30-year anniversary of scientific core-drilling through the active rock glacier Murtèl-Corvatsch (co-chairs tbd).

 

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10. Hydrology, Limnology and Hydrogeology

Pascal Blanc, Michael Doering, Tobias Jonas, Michael Sinreich, Massimiliano Zappa

Swiss Society for Hydrology and Limnology SGHL,
Swiss Hydrological Commission CHy,
Swiss Hydrogeological Society SGH

The session is open to contributions dealing with hydrology, limnology and hydrogeology at all scales, including contributions demonstrating interdisciplinary approaches.

This year particularly welcome are topics dealing with mountain regions and with implications of environmental change.

 

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11. Environmental Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements

Andreas Voegelin, Moritz Bigalke, Montserrat Filella, Adrien Mestrot, Lenny Winkel

Trace elements play crucial roles in aquatic and terrestrial environments as growth-limiting nutrients, but also as highly toxic or radioactive compounds. Trace elements derived from both natural and anthropogenic sources may thus critically affect ecosystem functioning and productivity as well as human health.

The environmental fate and impact of trace elements are controlled by their speciation and the intimate coupling of abiotic and biotic transformation processes at different scales, and are closely linked to the biogeochemical cycling of other elements such as Fe, Mn, Ca, P, S, or C.

To advance the state of knowledge on the biogeochemistry of trace elements from the molecular to the global scale, state-of-the-art analytical methods such as hyphenated and isotope techniques, synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopies, electron microscopies as well as (bio)geochemical and geostatistical modeling approaches can be used.

For this session, we invite contributions concerned with (bio)geochemical processes and their effects on trace element speciation, mobility, bioavailability, toxicity and distribution in natural and engineered environmental systems on different scales.

 

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12. Atmospheric Processes and Interactions with the Biosphere

Christof Ammann, Stefan Brönnimann, Susanne Burri, Martin Steinbacher

ACP – Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics,
ProClim – Forum for Climate and Global Change,

The aim of this session is to provide a platform for research reports from all fields related to climate science, atmospheric processes, and biosphere–atmosphere fluxes and interactions.

This session welcomes contributions that focus on relevant aspects of atmospheric, surface, or ecosystem processes, which either influence atmospheric composition and climate or are influenced by them. Exchange and feedback processes are of key interest, but also case studies of specific chemical, physical or ecosystem processes are welcome, as well as insights from long-term monitoring and larger research infrastructures. The latter include ICOS-CH (Integrated Carbon Observation System, Switzerland), the national contribution to a European network of stations measuring surface fluxes and atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases.

The session is suited to researchers working in the field of Climate Sciences, Atmospheric Physics and Chemistry, Physical Geography, Meteorology, Ecology and Agricultural Sciences. We also encourage young scientists to present their Master theses or PhD projects, either orally or in the accompanying poster session.

 

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13. Aerosols and clouds in a changing world

Christopher Hoyle, Ulrich Krieger

ACP – Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry

This session covers all topics related to aerosols, clouds and their interactions. Topics include for example, the chemistry and physics of aerosol formation and growth, the influence of aerosols on cloud formation and properties, chemical reactions occurring in aerosol particles and cloud droplets, aerosol formation from anthropogenic activities, and the role of the biosphere in aerosol production.

 

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14. Remote Sensing of the Spheres

Stefan Wunderle, Mathias Kneubühler, Dominik Brunner, Alain Geiger

Swiss Commission for Remote Sensing,
Swiss Geodetic Commission

During the symposium we expect overviews and in-depth presentations on state-of-the-art Earth Observation methods used for measuring the spheres of the Earth.

Recent advances in characterizing spheres and their interaction within the system Earth using remote sensing will be discussed and presented. Emphasis will be on coupled systems, chemical, biological and physical constituents mapping on land, atmosphere, ocean, as well as the solid Earth.

Furthermore, teams considering GNSS are encouraged to present their developments and applications. Monitoring aspects such as Essential Climate Variables (ECVs), supporting missions and programs from national and international organizations and agencies are invited to be presented, too.

 

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15. High alpine remote sensing

Yves Bühler, Christian Ginzler

Remote sensing sensors and platforms get more and more important for the acquisition of high spatial resolution geo-data in remote alpine areas. Often they are the only feasible and economic way of up-to-date data collection.

As the complex topography poses many problems to remote sensing such as steep slopes, high elevation differences or cast shadow, the aim of this session is to learn from the experience of different remote sensing specialists, applying their sensors in alpine terrain.

We would like to welcome presentations from all remote sensing fields including all sensor types as well as all platform types (ground based, unmanned aerial systems UAS, airborne, satellites) that are applied to alpine terrain.

 

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16. Geoscience and Geoinformation – From data acquisition to modelling and visualisation

Nils Oesterling, Adrian Wiget, Massimiliano Cannata, Michael Sinreich

Swiss Geodetic Commission,
Swiss Geotechnical Commission,
Swiss Geophysical Commission,
Swiss Hydrogeological Society

Digital data acquisition and 3D visualisation of geospatial objects and processes are already standard and are still gaining increasingly importance in geosciences. For instance geodetic data capture in combination with digital geological mapping constitutes an important basis for various tasks in engineering geology, natural hazard prevention and other geoscientific fields. Moreover, 3D modelling, GIS handling and visualisation of such data gives a better understanding of the respective problem setting.

In this symposium papers related to geospatial applications in all geosciences (geodesy, geophysics, geology, hydrogeology, engineering geology, geomorphology, etc.) will be presented. The focus will be on the following topics:

  • Development and application of digital tools for data capture
  • Transformation from field data to digital datasets and time series
  • Digital geological mapping and geoscientific information systems
  • 3D modelling, analysis of temporal variations and visualisation of geospatial objects and processes

Methodological papers as well as thematic case studies will be discussed. Contributions related to the topic of the 15th SGM Plenary Session «Moving boundaries», e.g. monitoring and analysis of dynamic processes, are especially welcome this year.

 

SGM 2017 Davos